maasai mara

  • Elephant Partners - Maasai Mara

    In early 2011, ElephantVoices launched "Elephant Partners", an elephant conservation project in the Maasai Mara ecosystem. The goal of Elephant Partners is to develop a working model for citizens to monitor and protect elephants. This initiative was made possible through support from the generous organisations and inviduals listed at the bottom of this page.

    The concept is to connect individual people - guides, scouts, researchers, photographers, tourists, people of the Maasai Mara and all those who care - with the lives of individual elephants. Through use of the Internet and social and educational media, our intention is to develop a community sharing knowledge of the Mara elephants and working together to protect them.

    Elephants are important for the survival of the Mara

    As an iconic landscape species elephants are important to the survival of the Mara. They play a key role in the ecosystem and, through tourism, in the local economy. Their great size, sociality, intelligence and charisma make them important Ambassadors for other threatened species. Yet, the Mara elephants are currently threatened by habitat loss, human-elephant conflict and ivory poaching. Many elephants are killed each year and an even greater number are wounded by spears, arrows and snares. By engaging people in

  • ElephantVoices eNewsletter September 2015

     

    Did you know….? Our work in Gorongosa, Mozambique, will be highlighted in episodes 2 and 5 of the six-part PBS series entitled, Gorongosa Park: Rebirth of Paradise. The film will premier on 22 September. Our photo of two Mabenzi family babies, taken on a rare drizzly, foggy morning in October 2013, has become an icon for the PBS series. The elephants were tucking into a bonanza of fallen seed pods under the Faidherbia albida trees.

    Dear friend of ElephantVoices,

    In Maasai Mara, Kenya, citizen scientists have been gathering data using our Mara EleApp and uploading to our Who's Who & Whereabouts Databases. In recent years human and livestock populations have increased and the landscape is being rapidly subdivided and fenced. Ivory poaching has hit the Mara elephants hard, too. While the outlook isn’t uplifting, elephants are resilient, flexible and smart, and we see these qualities reflected in the data: Elephants are strategically adapting their movements and behavior to overcome adversity and to balance access to security and resources. ElephantVoices is working with colleagues to define habitat and corridors to ensure long-term survival of elephants and connectivity of habitat. Many thanks to those who have made our work possible - JRS

  • History

    Joyce Poole has studied the social behavior and communication of African elephants for over thirty five years and has dedicated her life to their conservation and welfare. The inspiration for her life's work came from a childhood in Africa, a father with a love of nature, and a lecture by Jane Goodall that she attended at the age of eleven. She began her work with elephants at the age of 19 in Amboseli National Park studying there under mentor, and Director of the Amboseli Elephant Research Project, Cynthia Moss.

    Joyce Poole with new Nagra tape recorder in 1987. (Copyright: ElephantVoices)Decades-long study of elephant behavior and communication

    In Amboseli, Joyce's early work focused on the social and reproductive behavior of male elephants. Discovering in 1978 that African male elephants experience a heightened sexual and aggressive period known as musth, led her to carry out detailed study of their socio-sexual behavior. In the mid 1980s, she extended her study to elephant communication, first concentrating on the signaling patterns between males in musth. The very low frequency sounds produced by male elephants led to work with Katy Payne, and the finding that, like their Asian cousins, African elephants use sounds below the level of human hearing. Together, Joyce and Katy turned their attention

  • NEW REPORT: Mara ecosystem connectivity: Information on elephant population status and movements 
for spatial planning and conservation in Narok County

     

    Mara ecosystem connectivity: Information on elephant population status and movements
    for spatial planning and conservation in Narok County

     

    The report linked at the bottom of this page, Mara ecosystem connectivity: Information on elephant population status and movements for spatial planning and conservation in Narok County, has been prepared at the invitation of the Narok County Government Department of Lands, Urban Development and Physical Planning and the County Assembly Committee on Natural Resources at a stakeholders forum on spatial plan development and resource mobilisation held in Narok on 16 - 17 October 2014. 

    Front page Mara elephant report 2016The report presents findings of a collaborative study of elephants in the Maasai Mara ecosystem by ElephantVoices, Save the Elephants, Mara Elephant Project and Kenya Wildlife Service, and offers recommendations for the attention of Narok County. It contributes information about the status of elephants in the ecosystem, their movement patterns and habitat use for consideration in the county’s spatial planning process. The report lays emphasis on the need for urgent intervention to secure critical routes and habitats for long-term survival of elephants and to prevent escalating human elephant conflict and declining biodiversity which, if not halted, would have disastrous consequences for tourism and associated economic benefits for